Mapping the African American Past (MAAP) http://deimos3.apple.com/WebObjects/Core.woa/Browse/columbia.edu-dz.5706655809.05706655811 Columbia University Mapping the African American Past (MAAP) Columbia University en no Columbia University 2008 ccnmtl-itunesu@columbia.edu Mapping the American Past (MAAP) illustrates places and moments that have shaped the long history of African Americans in New York City. Mapping the American Past (MAAP) illustrates places and moments that have shaped the long history of African Americans in New York City. false no Abolitionist Place - description Willoughby and Duffield Streets <br /> In September of 2007, Duffield Street in downtown Brooklyn got a new name. Willoughby and Duffield Streets <br /> In September of 2007, Duffield Street in downtown Brooklyn got a new name. Willoughby and Duffield Streets <br /> In September of 2007, Duffield Street in downtown Brooklyn got a new name. 2607545564 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:11:29 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Abyssinian Baptist Church - description 132 West 138th Street <br /> Known for its charismatic leadership and community outreach, the Abyssinian Baptist Church was formed in 1808 by a group of African Americans and Ethiopians who refused to accept the segregated seating in the First Baptist Church of New York City. 132 West 138th Street <br /> Known for its charismatic leadership and community outreach, the Abyssinian Baptist Church was formed in 1808 by a group of African Americans and Ethiopians who refused to accept the segregated seating in the First Baptist Church of New York City. 132 West 138th Street <br /> Known for its charismatic leadership and community outreach, the Abyssinian Baptist Church was formed in 1808 by a group of African Americans and Ethiopians who refused to accept the segregated seating in the First Baptist Church of New York City. 3987382405 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:10:09 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Abyssinian Baptist Church - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, on the Abyssinian Baptist Church. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, on the Abyssinian Baptist Church. 2607545572 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:10:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Abyssinian Baptist Church - Robert O'Meally commentary Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University. Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University, on the Abyssinian Baptist Church. Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University, on the Abyssinian Baptist Church. 2607545575 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:10:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Burial Ground - description 290 Broadway <br /> The African Burial Ground is a federally designated historic landmark and archaeological site that was used as a cemetery by free and enslaved people of African descent during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 290 Broadway <br /> The African Burial Ground is a federally designated historic landmark and archaeological site that was used as a cemetery by free and enslaved people of African descent during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 290 Broadway <br /> The African Burial Ground is a federally designated historic landmark and archaeological site that was used as a cemetery by free and enslaved people of African descent during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 2607545578 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:09:12 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Burial Ground - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the African Burial Ground. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the African Burial Ground. 2607545582 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:09:04 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Burial Ground - Kellie Jones commentary Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses the African Burial Ground. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses the African Burial Ground. 2607545585 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:09:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Burial Ground - Dowoti Desir commentary Dowoti Desir, Executive Director of The Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center. Dowoti Desir, Executive Director of The Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center, discusses the African Burial Ground. Dowoti Desir, Executive Director of The Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center, discusses the African Burial Ground. 2607545588 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:09:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Burial Ground - Rodney Leon commentary Rodney Leon, African Burial Ground Memorial site architect. Rodney Leon, African Burial Ground Memorial architect, discusses the site. Rodney Leon, African Burial Ground Memorial architect, discusses the site. 2607545591 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:09:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Free School - description 135-137 Mulberry Street <br /> Soon after the Revolution, in 1785, a group of wealthy, powerful white men formed the New York Manumission Society. Although many were slave owners, their mission was to aid the enslaved, and to gradually end slavery in the state. 135-137 Mulberry Street <br /> Soon after the Revolution, in 1785, a group of wealthy, powerful white men formed the New York Manumission Society. Although many were slave owners, their mission was to aid the enslaved, and to gradually end slavery in the state. 135-137 Mulberry Street <br /> Soon after the Revolution, in 1785, a group of wealthy, powerful white men formed the New York Manumission Society. Although many were slave owners, their mission was to aid the enslaved, and to gradually end slavery in the state. 2607545594 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:08:28 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Grove Theater - description Mercer Street near Houston <br /> On Mercer Street in the fall of 1821, King Lear limped out onto stage and the audience went wild. Lear was black. Mercer Street near Houston <br /> On Mercer Street in the fall of 1821, King Lear limped out onto stage and the audience went wild. Lear was black. Mercer Street near Houston <br /> On Mercer Street in the fall of 1821, King Lear limped out onto stage and the audience went wild. Lear was black. 2607545598 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:07:42 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Methodist Church moves to Harlem - Cynthia Copland commentary African Methodist Church moves uptown to Harlem <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland African Methodist Church moves uptown to Harlem <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland African Methodist Church moves uptown to Harlem <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland 5401451500 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:06:10 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no African Society for Mutual Relief - description 42 Baxter Street <br /> As soon as it was legal for black New Yorkers to organize, they did so. In 1808, the African Society for Mutual Relief was founded. (The Society may have met in secret earlier, but there are no records to prove it.) 42 Baxter Street <br /> As soon as it was legal for black New Yorkers to organize, they did so. In 1808, the African Society for Mutual Relief was founded. (The Society may have met in secret earlier, but there are no records to prove it.) 42 Baxter Street <br /> As soon as it was legal for black New Yorkers to organize, they did so. In 1808, the African Society for Mutual Relief was founded. (The Society may have met in secret earlier, but there are no records to prove it.) 2607545602 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:05:14 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Audubon Ballroom - description 3940 Broadway <br /> Best known as the place where Malcolm X was assassinated on February 21, 1965, the Audubon Ballroom has long been a center of African American social and political activity. 3940 Broadway <br /> Best known as the place where Malcolm X was assassinated on February 21, 1965, the Audubon Ballroom has long been a center of African American social and political activity. 3940 Broadway <br /> Best known as the place where Malcolm X was assassinated on February 21, 1965, the Audubon Ballroom has long been a center of African American social and political activity. 2607545606 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:03:42 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Audubon Ballroom - Dowoti Desir commentary Dowoti Desir, Executive Director of The Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center. Dowoti Desir, Executive Director of The Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center, discusses the Audubon Ballroom. Dowoti Desir, Executive Director of The Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center, discusses the Audubon Ballroom. 2607545610 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:03:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Bedford-Stuyvesant - description Bedford-Stuyvesant, also known as Bed-Stuy, is home to the largest concentration of blacks in New York City and one of the largest in the country. Bedford-Stuyvesant, also known as Bed-Stuy, is home to the largest concentration of blacks in New York City and one of the largest in the country. Bedford-Stuyvesant, also known as Bed-Stuy, is home to the largest concentration of blacks in New York City and one of the largest in the country. 2607545613 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:02:50 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Bethel AME Church of Amityville - Lynda Day commentary Bethel AME Church, Amityville <br/> The Bethel AME Church of Amityville was the first black church on Long Island. Daniel Squires and Delaney H. Miller organized the church in 1815, after founding the Sunday school one year earlier.In 1839, Elias and Fanny Hunter offered land on Albany Avenue to the congregation but it would take four more years for the church to call this home. Bethel AME Church, Amityville <br/> The Bethel AME Church of Amityville was the first black church on Long Island. Daniel Squires and Delaney H. Miller organized the church in 1815, after founding the Sunday school one year earlier.In 1839, Elias and Fanny Hunter offered land on Albany Avenue to the congregation but it would take four more years for the church to call this home. Bethel AME Church, Amityville <br/> The Bethel AME Church of Amityville was the first black church on Long Island. Daniel Squires and Delaney H. Miller organized the church in 1815, after founding the Sunday school one year earlier.In 1839, Elias and Fanny Hunter offered land on Albany Avenue to the congregation but it would take four more years for the church to call this home. 5401451503 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:02:17 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Bethel AME Church - description Bethel AME Church, Amityville <br/> The Bethel AME Church of Amityville was the first black church on Long Island. Daniel Squires and Delaney H. Miller organized the church in 1815, after founding the Sunday school one year earlier.In 1839, Elias and Fanny Hunter offered land on Albany Avenue to the congregation but it would take four more years for the church to call this home. Bethel AME Church, Amityville <br/> The Bethel AME Church of Amityville was the first black church on Long Island. Daniel Squires and Delaney H. Miller organized the church in 1815, after founding the Sunday school one year earlier.In 1839, Elias and Fanny Hunter offered land on Albany Avenue to the congregation but it would take four more years for the church to call this home. Bethel AME Church, Amityville <br/> The Bethel AME Church of Amityville was the first black church on Long Island. Daniel Squires and Delaney H. Miller organized the church in 1815, after founding the Sunday school one year earlier.In 1839, Elias and Fanny Hunter offered land on Albany Avenue to the congregation but it would take four more years for the church to call this home. 3336887500 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:02:15 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Black Brigades - description 10 Church Street <br /> During the Revolution, at least 80,000 African Americans declared their own independence—and fled. 10 Church Street <br /> Blacks who fought with the British lived in “Negro barracks”. These men fought in units known as the Black Pioneers and the Black Brigade. Most did the hard support work the army needed, but some were armed and fought. 10 Church Street <br /> Blacks who fought with the British lived in “Negro barracks”. These men fought in units known as the Black Pioneers and the Black Brigade. Most did the hard support work the army needed, but some were armed and fought. 2607545617 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:01:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Booker T. Washington House - description Booker T. Washington House <br/> Booker T. Washington was born into slavery in 1856, and labored on the Burroughs tobacco farm in Virginia. Nine years later, he and his family were freed as a result of the Emancipation Proclamation and moved to West Virginia, where he worked in the salt mines while attending school. Booker T. Washington House <br/> Booker T. Washington was born into slavery in 1856, and labored on the Burroughs tobacco farm in Virginia. Nine years later, he and his family were freed as a result of the Emancipation Proclamation and moved to West Virginia, where he worked in the salt mines while attending school. Booker T. Washington House <br/> Booker T. Washington was born into slavery in 1856, and labored on the Burroughs tobacco farm in Virginia. Nine years later, he and his family were freed as a result of the Emancipation Proclamation and moved to West Virginia, where he worked in the salt mines while attending school. 3336887504 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:00:38 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Booker T. Washington House - Thelma Jackson-Abidally commentary Fort Salonga, Huntington, Long Island <br/> Between the years 1911 and 1915, Booker T. Washington traveled from Alabama to Fort Salonga for rest and relief from the hottest months of the summer. Located on the north shore of Long Island in the Town of Huntington, Fort Salonga was a peaceful, scenic place for the Washington family to spend their vacations. Fort Salonga, Huntington, Long Island <br/> Between the years 1911 and 1915, Booker T. Washington traveled from Alabama to Fort Salonga for rest and relief from the hottest months of the summer. Located on the north shore of Long Island in the Town of Huntington, Fort Salonga was a peaceful, scenic place for the Washington family to spend their vacations. Fort Salonga, Huntington, Long Island <br/> Between the years 1911 and 1915, Booker T. Washington traveled from Alabama to Fort Salonga for rest and relief from the hottest months of the summer. Located on the north shore of Long Island in the Town of Huntington, Fort Salonga was a peaceful, scenic place for the Washington family to spend their vacations. 4357569725 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:00:36 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Bridge Street AWME Church - description 311 Bridge Street <br /> It was October 1865, only months after the last shots of the Civil War were fired. People in Brooklyn opened their newspaper, the Brooklyn Eagle, to learn that "Last evening an immense congregation, fully half consisting of whites, was present at the African M. E. Church in Bridge street." 311 Bridge Street <br /> It was October 1865, only months after the last shots of the Civil War were fired. People in Brooklyn opened their newspaper, the Brooklyn Eagle, to learn that "Last evening an immense congregation, fully half consisting of whites, was present at the African M. E. Church in Bridge street." 311 Bridge Street <br /> It was October 1865, only months after the last shots of the Civil War were fired. People in Brooklyn opened their newspaper, the Brooklyn Eagle, to learn that "Last evening an immense congregation, fully half consisting of whites, was present at the African M. E. Church in Bridge street." 4033298824 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:00:18 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Catherine Ferguson - description 51 Warren Street <br /> Catherine ("Katy") Ferguson was born in 1779 with almost nothing—not even freedom. 51 Warren Street <br /> Catherine ("Katy") Ferguson was born in 1779 with almost nothing--not even freedom. 51 Warren Street <br /> Catherine ("Katy") Ferguson was born in 1779 with almost nothing--not even freedom. 2607545625 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:58:13 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Colored Orphan Asylum - description Fifth Avenue between 43rd and 44th Streets <br /> If you were black and orphaned in New York in the 1800s, there was nowhere to go but the cruel streets. Fifth Avenue between 43rd and 44th Streets <br /> If you were black and orphaned in New York in the 1800s, there was nowhere to go but the cruel streets. Fifth Avenue between 43rd and 44th Streets <br /> If you were black and orphaned in New York in the 1800s, there was nowhere to go but the cruel streets. 2607545629 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:57:17 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Colored Orphan Asylum - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the Colored Orphan Asylum. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the Colored Orphan Asylum. 2607545633 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:57:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no David Ruggles Home - description 67 Lispenard <br /> David Ruggles might have been the most hated activist of his day. 67 Lispenard <br /> David Ruggles might have been the most hated activist of his day. 67 Lispenard <br /> David Ruggles might have been the most hated activist of his day. 2607545636 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:56:16 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Downing's Oyster House - description 5 Broad Street <br /> Before New York was called the Big Apple, it could have been called the Big Oyster. 5 Broad Street <br /> Before New York was called the Big Apple, it could have been called the Big Oyster. 5 Broad Street <br /> Before New York was called the Big Apple, it could have been called the Big Oyster. 2607545640 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:42:34 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Duke Ellington - description 110th Street and 5th Avenue. <br /> Edward Kennedy Ellington (1899–1974), known as Duke Ellington, changed the sound of popular music in America and around the world. 110th Street and 5th Avenue. <br /> Edward Kennedy Ellington (1899–1974), known as Duke Ellington, changed the sound of popular music in America and around the world. 110th Street and 5th Avenue. <br /> Edward Kennedy Ellington (1899–1974), known as Duke Ellington, changed the sound of popular music in America and around the world. 2607545644 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:36:31 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Duke Ellington - Kellie Jones commentary Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses Duke Ellington. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses Duke Ellington. 2607545648 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:36:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Duke Ellington - Robert O'Meally commentary Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University. Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University, discusses Duke Ellington. Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University, discusses Duke Ellington. 2607545651 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:36:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Eastville Community - Lynda Day commentary Eastville, Long Island <br/> Eastville, like many early free African American communities on Long Island, was multi-ethnic. African Americans arrived in Sag Harbor seeking employment in the profitable whaling business sometime prior to 1840. Eastville, Long Island <br/> Eastville, like many early free African American communities on Long Island, was multi-ethnic. African Americans arrived in Sag Harbor seeking employment in the profitable whaling business sometime prior to 1840. Eastville, Long Island <br/> Eastville, like many early free African American communities on Long Island, was multi-ethnic. African Americans arrived in Sag Harbor seeking employment in the profitable whaling business sometime prior to 1840. 5401451506 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:35:05 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Eastville Community - description Eastville, Long Island <br/> Eastville, like many early free African American communities on Long Island, was multi-ethnic. African Americans arrived in Sag Harbor seeking employment in the profitable whaling business sometime prior to 1840. Eastville, Long Island <br/> Eastville, like many early free African American communities on Long Island, was multi-ethnic. African Americans arrived in Sag Harbor seeking employment in the profitable whaling business sometime prior to 1840. Eastville, Long Island <br/> Eastville, like many early free African American communities on Long Island, was multi-ethnic. African Americans arrived in Sag Harbor seeking employment in the profitable whaling business sometime prior to 1840. 3336887508 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:35:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Ebbets Field - description Sullivan Place & McKeever Place, Flatbush, Brooklyn <br /> Located in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, Ebbets Field was constructed in 1913, costing $750,000 to complete. Its home team was the Brooklyn Robins, renamed the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1932 . Sullivan Place & McKeever Place, Flatbush, Brooklyn <br /> Located in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, Ebbets Field was constructed in 1913, costing $750,000 to complete. Its home team was the Brooklyn Robins, renamed the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1932 . Sullivan Place & McKeever Place, Flatbush, Brooklyn <br /> Located in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, Ebbets Field was constructed in 1913, costing $750,000 to complete. Its home team was the Brooklyn Robins, renamed the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1932 . 2607545654 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:34:54 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Execution Grounds - description Foley Square btween Lafayette and Centre Streets <br /> The year 1741 started out badly. Poor whites and blacks lived in fear of freezing or starving to death. Foley Square btween Lafayette and Centre Streets <br /> The year 1741 started out badly. Poor whites and blacks lived in fear of freezing or starving to death. Foley Square btween Lafayette and Centre Streets <br /> The year 1741 started out badly. Poor whites and blacks lived in fear of freezing or starving to death. 2607545658 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:32:16 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Execution Grounds - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the Execution Grounds. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the Execution Grounds. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the Execution Grounds. 4273851875 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:31:18 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Five Points - description Worth Street & Baxter Street <br /> Five Points was a neighborhood around the intersection of Worth Street, Baxter Street, and Cross Street, which no longer exists. Worth Street & Baxter Street <br /> Five Points was a neighborhood around the intersection of Worth Street, Baxter Street, and Cross Street, which no longer exists. Worth Street & Baxter Street <br /> Five Points was a neighborhood around the intersection of Worth Street, Baxter Street, and Cross Street, which no longer exists. 2607545662 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:30:38 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Five Points - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Five Points. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Five Points. 2607545666 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:30:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Fort Amsterdam - description One Bowling Green <br /> Fort Amsterdam was designed to be a state-of-the-art diamond-shaped fort, built of stone and bristling with cannon. One Bowling Green <br /> Fort Amsterdam was designed to be a state-of-the-art diamond-shaped fort, built of stone and bristling with cannon. One Bowling Green <br /> Fort Amsterdam was designed to be a state-of-the-art diamond-shaped fort, built of stone and bristling with cannon. 2607545669 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:29:52 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Fort Amsterdam - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Fort Amsterdam. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Fort Amsterdam. 2607545673 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:29:30 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Fraunces Tavern - description 54 Pearl Street <br /> Around the time of the American Revolution, everyone in New York knew Samuel Fraunces. 54 Pearl Street <br /> Around the time of the American Revolution, everyone in New York knew Samuel Fraunces. 54 Pearl Street <br /> Around the time of the American Revolution, everyone in New York knew Samuel Fraunces. 2607545676 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:29:11 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Fraunces Tavern - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Fraunces Tavern. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Fraunces Tavern. 2607545680 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:29:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Freetown, Long Island - Allison Manfra McGovern commentary Freetown, East Hampton, Long Island <br/> Freetown is a small, unincorporated hamlet within the Town of East Hampton, located along Three Mile Harbor Road between Jackson Street and Abraham’s Path. Following the passage of the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799 in New York State, John Lyon Gardiner and other wealthy local slave-owners settled newly freed slaves in Freetown. Freetown, East Hampton, Long Island <br/> Freetown is a small, unincorporated hamlet within the Town of East Hampton, located along Three Mile Harbor Road between Jackson Street and Abraham’s Path. Following the passage of the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799 in New York State, John Lyon Gardiner and other wealthy local slave-owners settled newly freed slaves in Freetown. Freetown, East Hampton, Long Island <br/> Freetown is a small, unincorporated hamlet within the Town of East Hampton, located along Three Mile Harbor Road between Jackson Street and Abraham’s Path. Following the passage of the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799 in New York State, John Lyon Gardiner and other wealthy local slave-owners settled newly freed slaves in Freetown. 5401451509 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:28:25 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Frederick Douglass - description 36 Lispenard Street <br /> Dressed as a sailor, Frederick Bailey stepped ashore a free man, but he was not safe until the great abolitionist David Ruggles took him into his home. 36 Lispenard Street <br /> Dressed as a sailor, Frederick Bailey stepped ashore a free man, but he was not safe until the great abolitionist David Ruggles took him into his home. 36 Lispenard Street <br /> Dressed as a sailor, Frederick Bailey stepped ashore a free man, but he was not safe until the great abolitionist David Ruggles took him into his home. 4100125359 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:28:21 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Freedom's Journal - description Freedoms Journal <br/> Before 1827, blacks didn't exist in the newspapers, unless they committed a crime. African American weddings, births, deaths, and accomplishments were not to be found in a newspaper anywhere in the United States. But the year 1827 saw big changes. New York finally abolished slavery, and two young black men, John Brown Russwurm and Samuel E. Cornish, founded Freedom's Journal. Freedom's Journal <br/> Before 1827, blacks didn't exist in the newspapers, unless they committed a crime. African American weddings, births, deaths, and accomplishments were not to be found in a newspaper anywhere in the United States. But the year 1827 saw big changes. New York finally abolished slavery, and two young black men, John Brown Russwurm and Samuel E. Cornish, founded Freedom's Journal. Freedom's Journal <br/> Before 1827, blacks didn't exist in the newspapers, unless they committed a crime. African American weddings, births, deaths, and accomplishments were not to be found in a newspaper anywhere in the United States. But the year 1827 saw big changes. New York finally abolished slavery, and two young black men, John Brown Russwurm and Samuel E. Cornish, founded Freedom's Journal. 4273851879 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:28:21 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Freetown, Long Island - description Freetown, East Hampton, Long Island <br/> Freetown is a small, unincorporated hamlet within the Town of East Hampton, located along Three Mile Harbor Road between Jackson Street and Abraham’s Path. Following the passage of the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799 in New York State, John Lyon Gardiner and other wealthy local slave-owners settled newly freed slaves in Freetown. Freetown, East Hampton, Long Island <br/> Freetown is a small, unincorporated hamlet within the Town of East Hampton, located along Three Mile Harbor Road between Jackson Street and Abraham’s Path. Following the passage of the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799 in New York State, John Lyon Gardiner and other wealthy local slave-owners settled newly freed slaves in Freetown. Freetown, East Hampton, Long Island <br/> Freetown is a small, unincorporated hamlet within the Town of East Hampton, located along Three Mile Harbor Road between Jackson Street and Abraham’s Path. Following the passage of the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799 in New York State, John Lyon Gardiner and other wealthy local slave-owners settled newly freed slaves in Freetown. 3336887512 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:28:20 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Harlem - description Harlem has been a black community for over 100 years. Harlem has been a black community for over 100 years. Harlem has been a black community for over 100 years. 2607545687 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:28:15 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Harlem - Manning Marable commentary Dr. Manning Marable, Professor of History and Political Science; founding Director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University Dr. Manning Marable, Professor of History and Political Science and founding Director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University, discusses Harlem. Dr. Manning Marable, Professor of History and Political Science and founding Director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University, discusses Harlem. 2607545691 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:28:10 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Harlem - Robert O'Meally commentary Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University. Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University, discusses the Harlem Renaissance. Robert O'Meally, Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University, discusses the Harlem Renaissance. 2607545694 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:28:09 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Harlem Community Art Center - description 290 Lenox Avenue, Manhattan <br />The Harlem Community Art Center was created in November 1938. Its opening was attended by former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who welcomed the community’s new hub for creativity. During its brief life, the Harlem Community Art Center had a tremendous impact. Many of its students became artists who took pride in their culture and community. Paintings created by students at the Center often depicted scenes of Harlem; it was as if the students looked out a window and drew what they saw in the street. 290 Lenox Avenue, Manhattan <br />The Harlem Community Art Center was created in November 1938. Its opening was attended by former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who welcomed the community’s new hub for creativity. During its brief life, the Harlem Community Art Center had a tremendous impact. Many of its students became artists who took pride in their culture and community. Paintings created by students at the Center often depicted scenes of Harlem; it was as if the students looked out a window and drew what they saw in the street. 290 Lenox Avenue, Manhattan <br />The Harlem Community Art Center was created in November 1938. Its opening was attended by former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who welcomed the community’s new hub for creativity. During its brief life, the Harlem Community Art Center had a tremendous impact. Many of its students became artists who took pride in their culture and community. Paintings created by students at the Center often depicted scenes of Harlem; it was as if the students looked out a window and drew what they saw in the street. 2607545697 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:27:58 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Harlem Children's Zone - description 207 Lenox Ave, Manhattan <br /> In the mid 1990s, author and community leader Geoffrey Canada conceived of a new vision for Harlem. After years of hard work with Harlem’s Rheedlen Centers for Children and Families, Canada felt that many children in poor communities were still slipping between the cracks. He decided to create a program that would uplift the entire neighborhood: the Harlem Children’s Zone. 207 Lenox Ave, Manhattan <br /> In the mid 1990s, author and community leader Geoffrey Canada conceived of a new vision for Harlem. After years of hard work with Harlem’s Rheedlen Centers for Children and Families, Canada felt that many children in poor communities were still slipping between the cracks. He decided to create a program that would uplift the entire neighborhood: the Harlem Children’s Zone. 207 Lenox Ave, Manhattan <br /> In the mid 1990s, author and community leader Geoffrey Canada conceived of a new vision for Harlem. After years of hard work with Harlem’s Rheedlen Centers for Children and Families, Canada felt that many children in poor communities were still slipping between the cracks. He decided to create a program that would uplift the entire neighborhood: the Harlem Children’s Zone. 2607545701 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:27:54 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no The Harlem Hellfighters - description One West 142nd Street <br /> On a cold February afternoon in 1919, thousands of people gathered along New York's Fifth Avenue and swayed to music provided by military band leader James Reese. One West 142nd Street <br /> On a cold February afternoon in 1919, thousands of people gathered along New York's Fifth Avenue and swayed to music provided by military band leader James Reese. One West 142nd Street <br /> On a cold February afternoon in 1919, thousands of people gathered along New York's Fifth Avenue and swayed to music provided by military band leader James Reese. 2607545705 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:27:32 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Harlem Hellfighters - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the 369th Street Armory. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the 369th Street Armory. 2607545709 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:27:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Harriet Tubman - description 143 Nassau Street <br /> Harriet Tubman, or “Moses” as some called her, was worth $40,000 to anyone who could capture her and return her south. 143 Nassau Street <br /> Harriet Tubman, or “Moses” as some called her, was worth $40,000 to anyone who could capture her and return her south. 143 Nassau Street <br /> Harriet Tubman, or “Moses” as some called her, was worth $40,000 to anyone who could capture her and return her south. 2607545712 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:26:34 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Hofstra University - Martin Luther King, Jr., speech Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY <br/> Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Commencement Speech for Hofstra University. On June 13th 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. was Hofstra University’s honoree and guest speaker. King focused on the need for active participation to end racial inequality, poverty and war. Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY <br/> Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Commencement Speech for Hofstra University. On June 13th 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. was Hofstra University’s honoree and guest speaker. King focused on the need for active participation to end racial inequality, poverty and war. Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY <br/> Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Commencement Speech for Hofstra University. On June 13th 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. was Hofstra University’s honoree and guest speaker. King focused on the need for active participation to end racial inequality, poverty and war. 5401451512 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:25:47 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Hofstra University - description Hofstra University, Hempstead, Long Island <br/> Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke to several Long Island audiences in 1965, but on June 13th his commencement speech at Hofstra University stirred up a wide variety of community sentiments. Hofstra University, Hempstead, Long Island <br/> Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke to several Long Island audiences in 1965, but on June 13th his commencement speech at Hofstra University stirred up a wide variety of community sentiments. Hofstra University, Hempstead, Long Island <br/> Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke to several Long Island audiences in 1965, but on June 13th his commencement speech at Hofstra University stirred up a wide variety of community sentiments. 3336887516 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:25:45 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Hughson’s Tavern - description Liberty and Trinity <br /> In the spring of 1741, all eyes were on a tavern at the corner of Liberty and Trinity Streets. Liberty and Trinity <br /> In the spring of 1741, all eyes were on a tavern at the corner of Liberty and Trinity Streets. Liberty and Trinity <br /> In the spring of 1741, all eyes were on a tavern at the corner of Liberty and Trinity Streets. 2607545716 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:25:24 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Hughson's Tavern - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Hughson's Tavern. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Hughson's Tavern. 2607545720 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:25:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no James McCune Smith Pharmacy - description 93 West Broadway <br /> In 1824, the aged Revolutionary War hero General Lafayette returned to America for a tour of the nation he had helped to forge. 93 West Broadway <br /> In 1824, the aged Revolutionary War hero General Lafayette returned to America for a tour of the nation he had helped to forge. 93 West Broadway <br /> In 1824, the aged Revolutionary War hero General Lafayette returned to America for a tour of the nation he had helped to forge. 2607545723 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:24:11 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no John Street Church - description John Street Church <br/> At the opening of the John Street Methodist Church, the priest addressed "those in the gallery," welcoming the African Americans. The segregated black worshipers could cook the food, clean the homes, and care for the children of the white worshipers, but they could not pray together with them. John Street Church <br/> At the opening of the John Street Methodist Church, the priest addressed "those in the gallery," welcoming the African Americans. The segregated black worshipers could cook the food, clean the homes, and care for the children of the white worshipers, but they could not pray together with them. John Street Church <br/> At the opening of the John Street Methodist Church, the priest addressed "those in the gallery," welcoming the African Americans. The segregated black worshipers could cook the food, clean the homes, and care for the children of the white worshipers, but they could not pray together with them. 4146202426 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:23:18 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no John Street Church - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the John Street Church. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses the John Street Church. 2607545727 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:23:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Joseph Lloyd Manor - Jenna Coplin commentary Joseph Lloyd Manor <br/> Granted to James Lloyd I in 1685, Lloyd Manor encompassed approximately 3,000 acres of land on the north shore of Long Island. The Manor supplied the Boston-based merchant family with cider, cordwood, and clay among other inventory. It wasn't until 1711 that the first Lloyd, Henry, took up residence. That same year Henry Lloyd recorded the birth of a slave named Jupiter Hammon on Lloyd Neck. Joseph Lloyd Manor <br/> Granted to James Lloyd I in 1685, Lloyd Manor encompassed approximately 3,000 acres of land on the north shore of Long Island. The Manor supplied the Boston-based merchant family with cider, cordwood, and clay among other inventory. It wasn't until 1711 that the first Lloyd, Henry, took up residence. That same year Henry Lloyd recorded the birth of a slave named Jupiter Hammon on Lloyd Neck. Joseph Lloyd Manor <br/> Granted to James Lloyd I in 1685, Lloyd Manor encompassed approximately 3,000 acres of land on the north shore of Long Island. The Manor supplied the Boston-based merchant family with cider, cordwood, and clay among other inventory. It wasn't until 1711 that the first Lloyd, Henry, took up residence. That same year Henry Lloyd recorded the birth of a slave named Jupiter Hammon on Lloyd Neck. 5401451515 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:22:05 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Joseph Lloyd Manor - description Joseph Lloyd Manor <br/> Granted to James Lloyd I in 1685, Lloyd Manor encompassed approximately 3,000 acres of land on the north shore of Long Island. The Manor supplied the Boston-based merchant family with cider, cordwood, and clay among other inventory. It wasn't until 1711 that the first Lloyd, Henry, took up residence. That same year Henry Lloyd recorded the birth of a slave named Jupiter Hammon on Lloyd Neck. Joseph Lloyd Manor <br/> Granted to James Lloyd I in 1685, Lloyd Manor encompassed approximately 3,000 acres of land on the north shore of Long Island. The Manor supplied the Boston-based merchant family with cider, cordwood, and clay among other inventory. It wasn't until 1711 that the first Lloyd, Henry, took up residence. That same year Henry Lloyd recorded the birth of a slave named Jupiter Hammon on Lloyd Neck. Joseph Lloyd Manor <br/> Granted to James Lloyd I in 1685, Lloyd Manor encompassed approximately 3,000 acres of land on the north shore of Long Island. The Manor supplied the Boston-based merchant family with cider, cordwood, and clay among other inventory. It wasn't until 1711 that the first Lloyd, Henry, took up residence. That same year Henry Lloyd recorded the birth of a slave named Jupiter Hammon on Lloyd Neck. 4273851883 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:22:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Lakeville Community - Lynda Day commentary Lakeville <br/> Manhasset, a hamlet in the Town of North Hempstead, had a fairly large, steadfast African American settlement in the early 19th century. This community was unique due to its size and composition. The population was colonial in origin, comprised of people who were both born into slavery and "born free." By the third quarter of the 18th century, free African Americans had established a community along Valley Road near Lake Success Lakeville <br/> Manhasset, a hamlet in the Town of North Hempstead, had a fairly large, steadfast African American settlement in the early 19th century. This community was unique due to its size and composition. The population was colonial in origin, comprised of people who were both born into slavery and "born free." By the third quarter of the 18th century, free African Americans had established a community along Valley Road near Lake Success Lakeville <br/> Manhasset, a hamlet in the Town of North Hempstead, had a fairly large, steadfast African American settlement in the early 19th century. This community was unique due to its size and composition. The population was colonial in origin, comprised of people who were both born into slavery and "born free." By the third quarter of the 18th century, free African Americans had established a community along Valley Road near Lake Success 4273851887 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:21:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Lakeville Community - description Lakeville, Manhasset, Long Island <br/> Manhasset, a hamlet in the Town of North Hempstead, had a fairly large, steadfast African American settlement in the early nineteenth century. By the third quarter of the eighteenth century, free African Americans had established a community along Valley Road near Lake Success that was known variably as Success, Lakeville at Success and Valley Road. Lakeville, Manhasset, Long Island <br/> Manhasset, a hamlet in the Town of North Hempstead, had a fairly large, steadfast African American settlement in the early nineteenth century. By the third quarter of the eighteenth century, free African Americans had established a community along Valley Road near Lake Success that was known variably as Success, Lakeville at Success and Valley Road. Lakeville, Manhasset, Long Island <br/> Manhasset, a hamlet in the Town of North Hempstead, had a fairly large, steadfast African American settlement in the early nineteenth century. By the third quarter of the eighteenth century, free African Americans had established a community along Valley Road near Lake Success that was known variably as Success, Lakeville at Success and Valley Road. 3336887520 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:20:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Land of the Blacks - description Minetta Lane <br> In the hills and swamps that stretched across Manhattan Island one mile north of New Amsterdam, both free and enslaved blacks began to clear the tangle of trees, vines, and shrubs to build their own homes and plant their own gardens. Minetta Lane <br> In the hills and swamps that stretched across Manhattan Island one mile north of New Amsterdam, both free and enslaved blacks began to clear the tangle of trees, vines, and shrubs to build their own homes and plant their own gardens. Minetta Lane <br> In the hills and swamps that stretched across Manhattan Island one mile north of New Amsterdam, both free and enslaved blacks began to clear the tangle of trees, vines, and shrubs to build their own homes and plant their own gardens. 2607545730 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:17:20 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Langston Hughes - description 20 E 127th St <br /> One of the leading voices in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Langston Hughes focused his writing on the realistic plight of black people. 20 E 127th St <br /> One of the leading voices in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Langston Hughes focused his writing on the realistic plight of black people. 20 E 127th St <br /> One of the leading voices in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Langston Hughes focused his writing on the realistic plight of black people. 2607545734 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:16:32 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Conflict with Central Park Development - Cynthia Copland commentary Conflict with the development of Central Park in upper Manhattan. <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland Conflict with the development of Central Park in upper Manhattan. <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland Conflict with the development of Central Park in upper Manhattan. <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland 5401451518 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:16:31 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Langston Hughes - Kellie Jones commentary Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses Langston Hughes. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses Langston Hughes. 2607545738 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:16:01 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Louis Armstrong - description 34-56 107th Street in Queens <br /> The world’s most famous jazz musician lived in modest Corona, Queens. 34-56 107th Street in Queens <br /> The world’s most famous jazz musician lived in modest Corona, Queens. 34-56 107th Street in Queens <br /> The world’s most famous jazz musician lived in modest Corona, Queens. 2607545741 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:15:27 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Lewis H Latimer - description 34-41 137th Street in Flushing, Queens <br /> Lewis Latimer was born free in 1848; his parents George and Rebecca Latimer made sure of that. 34-41 137th Street in Flushing, Queens <br /> Lewis Latimer was born free in 1848; his parents George and Rebecca Latimer made sure of that. 34-41 137th Street in Flushing, Queens <br /> Lewis Latimer was born free in 1848; his parents George and Rebecca Latimer made sure of that. 2607545745 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:14:40 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Marcus Garvey - description 1900 Madison Ave. <br /> Thought by many blacks to be another Moses, Marcus Garvey rose from humble beginnings in Jamaica, West Indies, to become the number one advocate of the "Back to Africa movement." 1900 Madison Ave. <br /> Thought by many blacks to be another Moses, Marcus Garvey rose from humble beginnings in Jamaica, West Indies, to become the number one advocate of the "Back to Africa movement." 1900 Madison Ave. <br /> Thought by many blacks to be another Moses, Marcus Garvey rose from humble beginnings in Jamaica, West Indies, to become the number one advocate of the "Back to Africa movement." 2607545749 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:12:41 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Marcus Garvey - Kellie Jones commentary Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses Marcus Garvey. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses Marcus Garvey. 2607545753 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:12:05 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Marcus Garvey - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Marcus Garvey. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Marcus Garvey. 2607545756 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:12:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Minton's Playhouse - description 118th street at Saint Nicholas Avenue, Manhattan <br /> Henry Minton, a tenor saxophonist and the first black delegate to Local 802 of the musicians’ union, opened Minton’s Playhouse in 1938. Located on 118th street at Saint Nicholas Avenue in Harlem, adjacent to the Hotel Cecil, the Playhouse was a frequent temporary residence of musicians passing through New York. 118th street at Saint Nicholas Avenue, Manhattan <br /> Henry Minton, a tenor saxophonist and the first black delegate to Local 802 of the musicians’ union, opened Minton’s Playhouse in 1938. Located on 118th street at Saint Nicholas Avenue in Harlem, adjacent to the Hotel Cecil, the Playhouse was a frequent temporary residence of musicians passing through New York. 118th street at Saint Nicholas Avenue, Manhattan <br /> Henry Minton, a tenor saxophonist and the first black delegate to Local 802 of the musicians’ union, opened Minton’s Playhouse in 1938. Located on 118th street at Saint Nicholas Avenue in Harlem, adjacent to the Hotel Cecil, the Playhouse was a frequent temporary residence of musicians passing through New York. 2607545759 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:11:44 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Mother AME Zion Church - description 158 Church Street <br /> In the late 1700s, the Methodists of the mostly white John Street Church welcomed Africans and their descendents, and many came to worship there. 158 Church Street <br /> In the late 1700s, the Methodists of the mostly white John Street Church welcomed Africans and their descendents, and many came to worship there. 158 Church Street <br /> In the late 1700s, the Methodists of the mostly white John Street Church welcomed Africans and their descendents, and many came to worship there. 2607545763 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:11:41 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no New York City Draft Riots 1863 - description Gramercy Park <br /> With the Emancipation Proclamation, the Civil War began to be more about black freedom. Gramercy Park <br /> With the Emancipation Proclamation, the Civil War began to be more about black freedom. Gramercy Park <br /> With the Emancipation Proclamation, the Civil War began to be more about black freedom. 2607545767 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:10:48 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Origins of Seneca Village - Cynthia Copland commentary Formation of enclaves origins of Seneca Village, formerly in Central Park. <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland Formation of enclaves origins of Seneca Village, formerly in Central Park. <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland Formation of enclaves origins of Seneca Village, formerly in Central Park. <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland 5401451521 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:10:10 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Pierre Toussaint - description 263 Mulberry St <br /> In 1996, Pope John Paul II bestowed the title of “Venerable” on Pierre Toussaint. Two years later, Pierre Toussaint Square was named for him. 263 Mulberry St <br /> In 1996, Pope John Paul II bestowed the title of “Venerable” on Pierre Toussaint. Two years later, Pierre Toussaint Square was named for him. 263 Mulberry St <br /> In 1996, Pope John Paul II bestowed the title of “Venerable” on Pierre Toussaint. Two years later, Pierre Toussaint Square was named for him. 4100125363 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:10:04 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Ralph Ellison Memorial - description Riverside Park on 150th Street, Manhattan <br /> The Ralph Ellison Memorial at Riverside Park on 150th Street, Manhattan New York is not your typical African American landmark in New York City. The site is completely free and public. Located at the end of a one-way street between two busy roads and set within a collection of bustling Harlem apartment buildings and bodegas, the site offers a visual and atmospheric contrast; a place where New York urbanity meets the tranquil Hudson River. Riverside Park on 150th Street, Manhattan <br /> The Ralph Ellison Memorial at Riverside Park on 150th Street, Manhattan New York is not your typical African American landmark in New York City. Riverside Park on 150th Street, Manhattan <br /> The Ralph Ellison Memorial at Riverside Park on 150th Street, Manhattan New York is not your typical African American landmark in New York City. 2607545775 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:07:54 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Rikers Island - description Rikers Island <br /> On March 5, 1864, a crowd of over 10,000 New Yorkers watched in awe as 1,000 well-disciplined Union army troops left Rikers Island and marched west to the Hudson River, their dark blue uniforms and crisp white gloves and white leggings glistening in the sunlight. Rikers Island <br /> On March 5, 1864, a crowd of over 10,000 New Yorkers watched in awe as 1,000 well-disciplined Union army troops left Rikers Island and marched west to the Hudson River, their dark blue uniforms and crisp white gloves and white leggings glistening in the sunlight. Rikers Island <br /> On March 5, 1864, a crowd of over 10,000 New Yorkers watched in awe as 1,000 well-disciplined Union army troops left Rikers Island and marched west to the Hudson River, their dark blue uniforms and crisp white gloves and white leggings glistening in the sunlight. 2607545779 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:07:50 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Rikers Island - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Rikers Island. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Rikers Island. 2607545783 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:07:30 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Rocky Point - description Rocky Point <br/> Rocky Point is a hamlet located in northern Brookhaven Town. Today, it is a typical suburban settlement characterized by strip malls and shopping areas along North Country Road and residential neighborhoods to the north of this main road. In the 19th century, however, it was a rural, farming community and home to a small settlement of African Americans. Rocky Point <br/> Rocky Point is a hamlet located in northern Brookhaven Town. Today, it is a typical suburban settlement characterized by strip malls and shopping areas along North Country Road and residential neighborhoods to the north of this main road. In the 19th century, however, it was a rural, farming community and home to a small settlement of African Americans. Rocky Point <br/> Rocky Point is a hamlet located in northern Brookhaven Town. Today, it is a typical suburban settlement characterized by strip malls and shopping areas along North Country Road and residential neighborhoods to the north of this main road. In the 19th century, however, it was a rural, farming community and home to a small settlement of African Americans. 4273851894 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:07:22 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Samuel Ballton - description Samuel Ballton <br/> Samuel Ballton was a well-respected citizen of Greenlawn in the Town of Huntington. It was in 1899 that Ballton was crowned the "Pickle King." His efforts produced an amazing crop of 1.5 million pickles in a single season. Ballton, however, had already led a remarkable life and went on to leave a unique legacy. Samuel Ballton <br/> Samuel Ballton was a well-respected citizen of Greenlawn in the Town of Huntington. It was in 1899 that Ballton was crowned the "Pickle King." His efforts produced an amazing crop of 1.5 million pickles in a single season. Ballton, however, had already led a remarkable life and went on to leave a unique legacy. Samuel Ballton <br/> Samuel Ballton was a well-respected citizen of Greenlawn in the Town of Huntington. It was in 1899 that Ballton was crowned the "Pickle King." His efforts produced an amazing crop of 1.5 million pickles in a single season. Ballton, however, had already led a remarkable life and went on to leave a unique legacy. 4273851898 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:07:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Sandy Ground - description 1538 Woodrow Road <br /> On February 23, 1828, Captain John Jackson purchased land in a place known as Sandy Ground on what is now Staten Island. 1538 Woodrow Road <br /> On February 23, 1828, Captain John Jackson purchased land in a place known as Sandy Ground on what is now Staten Island. 1538 Woodrow Road <br /> On February 23, 1828, Captain John Jackson purchased land in a place known as Sandy Ground on what is now Staten Island. 2607545786 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:06:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Schomburg Library - description 515 Malcolm X Blvd <br /> The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture holds one of the best library collections focused on black history in the world. 515 Malcolm X Blvd <br /> The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture holds one of the best library collections focused on black history in the world. 515 Malcolm X Blvd <br /> The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture holds one of the best library collections focused on black history in the world. 2607545790 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:05:37 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Schomberg Library - Kellie Jones commentary Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses the Shomberg Library. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses the Shomberg Library. 2607545794 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:05:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Seneca Village- description Central Park near West Drive & 85th Street <br /> As a community of free black property owners, Seneca Village was unique in its day. Central Park near West Drive & 85th Street <br /> As a community of free black property owners, Seneca Village was unique in its day. Central Park near West Drive & 85th Street <br /> As a community of free black property owners, Seneca Village was unique in its day. 2607545797 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:04:45 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Seneca Village Community - Cynthia Copland commentary Seneca Village Community <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland Seneca Village Community <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland Seneca Village Community <br/> Commentary by Cynthia Copland 5401451524 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:04:35 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Seneca Village - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Seneca Village. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Seneca Village. 2607545801 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:04:30 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Shiloh Presbyterian Church - description 409 W. 141st St. <br /> The Shiloh Presbyterian Church boasts a long tradition of radical black leadership. 409 W. 141st St. <br /> The Shiloh Presbyterian Church boasts a long tradition of radical black leadership. 409 W. 141st St. <br /> The Shiloh Presbyterian Church boasts a long tradition of radical black leadership. 2607545804 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:04:02 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Slave Revolt of 1712 - description Maiden Place <br /> In the early 1700s, New York had one of the largest slave populations of any of England’s colonies. Maiden Place <br /> In the early 1700s, New York had one of the largest slave populations of any of England’s colonies. Maiden Place <br /> In the early 1700s, New York had one of the largest slave populations of any of England’s colonies. 2607545808 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:02:28 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Sojourner Truth - description 74 Canal Street <br /> In 1797, a baby girl named Isabella was born in upstate New York. 74 Canal Street <br /> In 1797, a baby girl named Isabella was born in upstate New York. 74 Canal Street <br /> In 1797, a baby girl named Isabella was born in upstate New York. 2607545812 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:01:38 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no St. Philip's Episcopalian Church - description 31 Centre Street <br /> The congregation of St. Philip’s has roots that reach back to 1704. 31 Centre Street <br /> The congregation of St. Philip’s has roots that reach back to 1704. 31 Centre Street <br /> The congregation of St. Philip’s has roots that reach back to 1704. 4100125367 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:00:51 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no St. Philip's Episcopalian Church - Kellie Jones commentary Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses St. Philip's Episcopalian Church. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses St. Philip's Episcopalian Church. 2607545819 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 15:00:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Studio Museum in Harlem - description 144 W 125th St <br /> From before this nation was formed, Africans and their descendants have contributed enormously to American culture. 144 W 125th St <br /> From before this nation was formed, Africans and their descendants have contributed enormously to American culture. 144 W 125th St <br /> From before this nation was formed, Africans and their descendants have contributed enormously to American culture. 2607545822 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:59:59 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Studio Museum in Harlem - Kellie Jones commentary Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses The Studio Museum in Harlem. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University, discusses The Studio Museum in Harlem. 2607545826 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:59:25 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Tappan Brothers - description 122 Pearl Street <br /> Lewis and Arthur Tappan were brothers who earned a fortune importing silk from Asia. 122 Pearl Street <br /> Lewis and Arthur Tappan were brothers who earned a fortune importing silk from Asia. 122 Pearl Street <br /> Lewis and Arthur Tappan were brothers who earned a fortune importing silk from Asia. 4100125370 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:59:07 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Gideon and the Great Dock - description Pearl St. between Whitehall Street and Broad Street <br /> On an August day in 1664, the Dutch ship Gideon reached the Great Dock in New Amsterdam. Pearl St. between Whitehall Street and Broad Street <br /> On an August day in 1664, the Dutch ship Gideon reached the Great Dock in New Amsterdam. Pearl St. between Whitehall Street and Broad Street <br /> On an August day in 1664, the Dutch ship Gideon reached the Great Dock in New Amsterdam. 2607545833 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:57:31 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Manhattan Company - description 40 Wall Street <br /> The Manhattan Company was formed to bring fresh water to New Yorkers. Or at least that was its stated purpose. 40 Wall Street <br /> The Manhattan Company was formed to bring fresh water to New Yorkers. Or at least that was its stated purpose. 40 Wall Street <br /> The Manhattan Company was formed to bring fresh water to New Yorkers. Or at least that was its stated purpose. 2607545837 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:56:45 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Slave Market - description Wall Street and Water Street <br /> In 1711, New York was growing quickly, and the growing needs of the city were often supplied by slave labor. Wall Street and Water Street <br /> In 1711, New York was growing quickly, and the growing needs of the city were often supplied by slave labor. Wall Street and Water Street <br /> In 1711, New York was growing quickly, and the growing needs of the city were often supplied by slave labor. 2607545841 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:53:17 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Theodore Wright House - description 235 W. Broadway <br /> One day in the mid-1800s, 28 men, women, and children snuck into New York City. 235 W. Broadway <br /> One day in the mid-1800s, 28 men, women, and children snuck into New York City. 235 W. Broadway <br /> One day in the mid-1800s, 28 men, women, and children snuck into New York City. 2607545845 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:52:32 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Tontine Coffeehouse - description Across from the Meal Market, where enslaved workers could be hired or bought, was the Tontine Coffee House, home of the New York Stock Exchange. Across from the Meal Market, where enslaved workers could be hired or bought, was the Tontine Coffee House, home of the New York Stock Exchange. Across from the Meal Market, where enslaved workers could be hired or bought, was the Tontine Coffee House, home of the New York Stock Exchange. 2607545849 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:51:42 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Wall Street - description One Wall Street <br /> A gang of black men labored as long as daylight allowed, digging a three-foot-deep trench from the East River all the way across Manhattan Island to the Hudson River. One Wall Street <br /> A gang of black men labored as long as daylight allowed, digging a three-foot-deep trench from the East River all the way across Manhattan Island to the Hudson River. One Wall Street <br /> A gang of black men labored as long as daylight allowed, digging a three-foot-deep trench from the East River all the way across Manhattan Island to the Hudson River. 2607545853 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:48:42 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Wall Street - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Wall Street. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Wall Street. 2607545857 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:47:21 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Weeksville - description 1698 Bergen Street <br /> Far from the bustle and racism of Manhattan, on what was then the outskirts of Brooklyn, free blacks built a community called Weeksville. 1698 Bergen Street <br /> Far from the bustle and racism of Manhattan, on what was then the outskirts of Brooklyn, free blacks built a community called Weeksville. 1698 Bergen Street <br /> Far from the bustle and racism of Manhattan, on what was then the outskirts of Brooklyn, free blacks built a community called Weeksville. 2607545860 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:38:41 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no Weeksville - Kenneth Jackson commentary Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Weeksville. Kenneth Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Columbia University, discusses Weeksville. 2607545864 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:30:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no West Indian Day Parade - description Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue, Brooklyn <br /> Many slaves brought the tradition of African outdoor ceremonies to the Caribbean. However, once enslaved, they were prohibited from holding public celebrations despite their slaveholders' engagement in street parades like Mardi Gras.The Harlem permit was revoked in 1964 due to a violent riot. Five years later, a committee organized by Trinidadian Carlos Lezama obtained another permit for a parade on Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn. The parade has been held there ever since, beginning at Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue and ending at Grand Army Plaza. Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue, Brooklyn <br /> Many slaves brought the tradition of African outdoor ceremonies to the Caribbean. However, once enslaved, they were prohibited from holding public celebrations despite their slaveholders' engagement in street parades like Mardi Gras.The Harlem permit was revoked in 1964 due to a violent riot. Five years later, a committee organized by Trinidadian Carlos Lezama obtained another permit for a parade on Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn. The parade has been held there ever since, beginning at Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue and ending at Grand Army Plaza. Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue, Brooklyn <br /> Many slaves brought the tradition of African outdoor ceremonies to the Caribbean. However, once enslaved, they were prohibited from holding public celebrations despite their slaveholders' engagement in street parades like Mardi Gras.The Harlem permit was revoked in 1964 due to a violent riot. Five years later, a committee organized by Trinidadian Carlos Lezama obtained another permit for a parade on Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn. The parade has been held there ever since, beginning at Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue and ending at Grand Army Plaza. 2607545867 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:27:54 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no William Floyd Estate - Lynda Day commentary 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island <br/> William Floyd, the first son of Nicoll and Tabitha Floyd, was born on the south shore of Long Island in 1734. His father purchased the Mastic Beach property in 1724 building the Old Mastic house to serve as the family’s home. 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island <br/> William Floyd, the first son of Nicoll and Tabitha Floyd, was born on the south shore of Long Island in 1734. His father purchased the Mastic Beach property in 1724 building the Old Mastic house to serve as the family’s home. 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island <br/> William Floyd, the first son of Nicoll and Tabitha Floyd, was born on the south shore of Long Island in 1734. His father purchased the Mastic Beach property in 1724 building the Old Mastic house to serve as the family’s home. 5401451527 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:25:05 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no William Floyd Estate - description 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island <br/> William Floyd, the first son of Nicoll and Tabitha Floyd, was born on the south shore of Long Island in 1734. His father purchased the Mastic Beach property in 1724 building the Old Mastic house to serve as the family’s home. 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island <br/> William Floyd, the first son of Nicoll and Tabitha Floyd, was born on the south shore of Long Island in 1734. His father purchased the Mastic Beach property in 1724 building the Old Mastic house to serve as the family’s home. 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island <br/> William Floyd, the first son of Nicoll and Tabitha Floyd, was born on the south shore of Long Island in 1734. His father purchased the Mastic Beach property in 1724 building the Old Mastic house to serve as the family’s home. 3336887527 Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:25:00 GMT Columbia University 0:00:00 no Education Columbia University no